Tingalpa Creek

Lota Creek, Thorneside

Tingalpa Creek

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tingalpa Creek is a creek that flows along Brisbane’s south east boundary with Redland City Council. The waterway serves as important wildlife corridor on the city’s fringe. There is spectacular diversity of different habitat types in this catchment which leads to an amazing array of wildlife living in the Lota and lower Tingalpa Creek catchments.
There is a spectacular diversity of different habitat types in this catchment, which leads to an amazing array of wildlife living in the Lota and lower Tingalpa Creek catchments.

  • Some of the notable species that call this area of the world home include:
  • Raptors (brown and grey goshawks, pacific bazas, ospreys and white-bellied sea-eagles)
  • Migratory Wading Birds (black-winged stilts, little terns and eastern curlews)
  • Small forest and grass birds (chest-nut breasted mannikins, leaden flycatchers and golden-headed cisticolas)
  • Rainbow bee-eaters and king fishers
  • Red-bellied black snakes
  • Squirrel gliders
  • Bandicoots (often confirmed by the diggings they leave behind from the night before)
  • Graceful green treefrogs, common green treefrogs, Naked treefrogs, eastern gungans and ornate burrowing frogs

Tingalpa Creek has its headwaters in Venman Bushland National Park at Mount Cotton and the Brisbane Koala Park in Burbank. It then flows a short distance through Sheldon to the waters of the Leslie Harrison Dam.

Tingalpa Creek

Bridge over Tingalpa Creek, 1936

The creek below the dam, now tidal, continues along its winding course through Capalaba West, Birkdale and Ransome. In this area the creek which is popular with recreational anglers, is bordered by the Capalaba Regional Park, John Fredericks Park, Sciacca Sportsfield to the east and Tingalpa Creek Reserve on its western side.
The Cleveland railway line crosses the creek before it flows to Moreton Bay at Thorneside, Queensland.